Where do you take a hangover in Mayfair?

 

Tyne O'Connell with hens in park F&M picnic basket purple dressby ©Tyne O’Connell

When a chap or chappess has a tipple too much on a night out in Mayfair then a morning after hangover cure must be taken. But where does one turn?

Tyne O’Connell gives us a few pointers to keep the kidneys pure…

The London Library is a never fail hangover cure. First purify the little grey cells, then take a cheeky flask and nip out to your nearby Private Member’s Club for lunch.

White Cube on Masons Yard St James’s. Artwork clears your mind; blows away the cobwebs and flushes the kidneys. A quick zip around the gallery and its on to Wilton’s on Jermyn St – where they’ve been bucking up chaps and chappesses with native oysters and fine Champagne since 1742.

Tyne O'Connell in Farm St church with champagne and regal spaniel

Tyne O’Connell in Farm St church with champagne and regal spaniel

A fine example of the Mayfair Spirit was exhibited by Olaf Hambro who was cheerfully quaffing his oysters and lapping up a saucer of champagne in 1942 when the wretched hun dropped a bomb on Sir Christopher Wrens St James’s Church a few doors down. When told the restaurant was now closed he calmly asked the proprietress Mrs Leal to have the restaurant be added to his bill.

A stalwart cure can always be found in a few laps at the Lansdowne pool, a sauna and then a hearty lunch in the Dining Room followed by a stroll to St James’s Street.

Following in the footsteps of Oscar Wilde and Evelyn Waugh you could take your world weary soul to the confessional at the Church of The Immaculate Conception on Farm St. Much better to get the night before off one’s chest in the comfortable beauty of this Gothic Revival Gem while soaking up the beauty of Pugin’s Alter.

Tyne O'Connell swings from chandelier in Claridges Hotel, Mayfair

Tyne O’Connell swings from chandelier in Claridges Hotel, Mayfair

With your soul unburdened potter down to the Landsdowne House one of Robert Adam’s Gems visitors of history since 1763 include Madame De Stael, Fanny Burney and Lord Byron. Harry Selfridge leased the house in 1921 and in 1935 it became private member’s Club for men and women. The draw of the Landsdowne Club is the Art Deco splendour of its basement swimming pool which was the centre of larkyness for the Bright Young Things of the 1920’s and 30’s. One of whom regaled me with stories of her youth; remembering the rare times they had, swinging over the pool’s from chandeliers after attending balls upstairs. “We used to dive from the wooden diving boards into the pool in full white tie and ballgowns; diamond tiara’s and all.” Sadly Health & Safety have seen the wooden diving boards removed but old photographs scattered about the club give a glimpse into this Mayfair World of the Bright Young Things.

Tyne in Berry Bros

After a swim you might take a sauna followed by a hearty lunch in the Dining Room. If your head still aches pop into the Chemist on St James’s St D. R. Harris & Co where they’ve been selling hangover cures to Royals since 1790. Afterwards you can pop in to Berry Bros a few doors away and weigh yourself where the chaps and chapesses of Mayfair St James’s have been weighing themselves since 1698.

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